TV Synchronized Media

Leveraging an Audience-First and Data-Driven Second Screen Strategy

Defining TV Synchronized Media

Before diving into determining whether TV synchronized media would help achieve your brand objectives, it’s important to first ground ourselves in understanding what TV synchronized media truly is. TV synchronized media can be defined as utilizing a technology platform to automatically trigger a digital exposure based on what is seen and/or heard on TV (both advertisements and program content) in real time. TV synchronized media is also often referred to as a second screen strategy as it capitalizes on key audience behaviors of utilizing a second screen (i.e., mobile phone or tablet) while watching TV.

Usage and Behavior Trends in the Marketplace

Overall, Nielsen reports that 73% of US adults are utilizing a second screen simultaneously while watching TV. It’s no doubt that second screen usage is growing in adoption and advertisers need to be cognizant of the fight for attention and engagement. Digging a little deeper than overall adoption, it’s easy to assume Millennials are the key demographic driving this behavior – in fact eMarketer reports that Millennials are 11% more likely to partake in second screen activity while watching TV; however, they aren’t the only demographic partaking. The 2018/2019 Kantar MARS Health study reports that Millennials are much more likely to text a friend, purchase a product that was advertised on TV, look for a product advertised on TV, or utilize social media while watching TV than the general population. However, while Gen Z and Baby Boomers aren’t as likely to exercise those specific behaviors, they are also driving second screen behavior and are more likely than the general population to use a second screen while watching TV. There is certainly an opportunity to reach this demographic based on their behavior though it may require deeper behavioral insight to determine this strategy.

What Should Brands Think About When Activating a Second Screen Strategy?

Broadly speaking, there are a few key objectives that a second screen strategy could help support. Along with these key objectives, it’s important to consider your brand’s media channels in market (i.e., does your brand have or is a competitor utilizing a TV strategy?). See below for examples of key objectives and strategies that could help provide a solution:

Awareness and Reach:
This may be the most obvious application of a second screen strategy but is also very effective. Brands investing in TV media can extend their media dollars by utilizing a second screen strategy with triggered messaging across digital channels to amplify key messaging for continued and more convenient engagement.

Cut through Clutter: Brands can utilize content targeting via TV networks, shows, or even keywords to trigger display advertising. Cost efficiencies can be gained around premium content or events, such as sports or award shows, while attention is diverted.

Competitive Conquesting: Brands can use their competitor’s TV investment to capitalize on relevant mindsets and audiences via display messaging.

Disease Education or Misdiagnosis Trigger: Think beyond strictly competitive TV investment and consider comorbidity advertisement activity to act on an audience’s mindset. If your product is for a condition that is often misdiagnosed or niche – consider targeting TV exposure for products that treat similar symptoms, comorbidities, or that treat the frequently misdiagnosed conditions. Consider the mindset those targeted commercials evoke – exposure to your product messaging could provide a solution to similar symptoms or trigger a misdiagnosis consideration while the audience is considering their current treatment.

Campaign Learnings

Both case studies highlighted below were activated to achieve extended TV reach with amplified messaging across a subset of channels in market.

Case Study #1

CMI/Compas recently supported a multichannel consumer campaign with the goal of reaching early line, Millennial patients to increase awareness and consideration of a product in a crowded competitive landscape. The brand invested in TV and was interested in innovative ways to pull through strategy across channels. CMI/Compas analyzed audience behavior through the MARS Health Study to find that this audience indexed highly for second screen behavior – including social media and researching a product seen on TV, thus identifying an opportunity to reach this audience during key moments of engagement and attention.

Upon evaluation, CMI/Compas identified a supplier partner with the ability to implement a second screen execution across Display, SEM, and Social channels with the goal of amplifying messaging from the TV campaign to key audiences and, therefore, qualified reach and awareness. A second screen strategy executed across multiple channels ensures amplified messaging across multiple touchpoints and, therefore, provides multiple opportunities for engagement and exposure.

CMI/Compas executed a managed display campaign with the identified supplier partner that married TV exposure data to 3rd party data to retarget a qualified audience 48 hours after exposure to the brand’s commercial. SEM and Social campaigns were executed through a self-service platform that syncs to identified SEM and Social campaigns to trigger increased bids or launch during the time of exposure for 10-20 minutes post-exposure. This continues as the brand’s TV commercial airs.

Though the campaign is in its early stages, CMI/Compas has identified a trend of high and efficient performance among key metrics of CTR and CPC for self-service platforms (SEM & Social). The combination of high awareness media in market (TV) and the identified supplier partner’s ability to layer additional targeting based on that media in market is an opportunity for increased targeting within these key channels which, under normal circumstances, are limited in their targeting capabilities. As for display, CMI/Compas has seen performance on par with our additional programmatic opportunities in market as far as CTR, Reach, and Audience Quality as measured by a 3rd party data provider. This may be due to the recency of exposure – display is delayed by 48 hours due to additional targeting parameters. As an optimization recommendation, CMI/Compas recommends testing a placement for targeting instantly upon TV exposure against the additional targeting parameters.

Case Study #2

CMI/Compas executed a multi-channel consumer campaign with the goal of extending TV reach and awareness of a new seasonal product to market with a broad target audience. The brand invested in TV planned to strategic and key demographic markets and was interested in capitalizing on the impact of their TV launch with multi-channel exposures.

Upon evaluation, CMI/Compas identified a supplier partner with the ability to implement a second screen execution across Display, OLV, SEM, and Social channels with the goal of amplifying messaging from the TV campaign to key audiences and, therefore, qualified reach and awareness. A second screen strategy executed across multiple channels ensures amplified messaging across multiple touchpoints and, therefore, provides multiple opportunities for awareness and exposure.

CMI/Compas executed a managed display and OLV campaign with the identified supplier partner that re-targeted audiences programmatically and instantly upon exposure to both the brand’s and competitor’s commercials. SEM and Social campaigns were executed through a self-service platform that syncs to identified SEM and Social campaigns to trigger increased bids or launch during the time of exposure for 10-20 minutes post-exposure. This continues as the brand’s and competitor’s TV commercials air.

Similarly to Case Study #1, CMI/Compas saw high and efficient performance among key metrics of CTR and CPC for SEM as well as back end metrics in valued actions on site. However, CMI/Compas saw less efficient performance in comparison with standard campaigns in terms of VTR and CPV for Social. As for display, the campaign did see lower performance in front end, back end, and Audience Quality as measured by a 3rd party data provider. In the case of both Social and Display, this may be due to the cluttered competitive market which triggered all campaigns frequently and may have caused wasted impressions and reach. As a learning, CMI/Compas recommends testing performance by TV Exposure vs. Competitive Exposure to test if the competitive targeting is too broad.

Key Takeaways

Current campaigns at CMI/Compas have uncovered additional learnings when implementing a second screen strategy as well as important considerations when setting up the campaign for success to reach key patient populations.

Targeting triggers: There are a few key considerations when thinking through targeting triggers and they vary by channel. Overall, consider the timing of the trigger in relation to the recency of exposure. Partners may have the ability to layer additional targeting to help reach your target however – this capability may take time to implement and you could be missing out on a key time to reach your audience.

Self-service Platforms vs. Managed Service: Consider performance by channels that are typically self-service (i.e., SEM & Social) vs. Display which is typically managed and adjust KPIs as necessary. The key takeaway here is considering the level of targeting that each of these channels can execute. Overall, a second screen activation across SEM & Social allows for an additional layer of targeting and identifying a qualified audience, thus can be expected to lead to higher performance.

Data Sources: Consider data sources that can help play a role in identifying a more qualified audience and consider these sources by channel. Partners may have the ability to implement additional targeting such as demo or health data targeting across display campaigns but there are also additional data sources to consider for channels such as Social. TV Exposure data can be used to trigger campaigns, but it can also be used as a third-party source to target a more qualified audience. Rather than simply turning on a campaign while the TV commercial airs, you can verify who paid ads are delivered to by that exposure data and eliminate waste.

Audience Behavior: Allow audience behavior to lead your second screen strategy. Be cognizant of your audience’s mindset and intent at the moment of engagement to understand what they are truly looking for in that moment. Are they looking for educational materials on the condition since they may be early in their diagnosis or are they maybe a little further along and may be looking for resources in how to drive a doctor discussion? These insights will help to drive relevant messaging and ultimately further engagement.

Conclusion

Second screen adoption is growing rapidly, and it’s an important consideration when evaluating your brand’s advertising strategy. As always, CMI/Compas recommends a multichannel and audience-first approach and a second screen execution is no different. The moment of engagement with a second screen strategy is important, but so is messaging at that moment. Marketers should adopt an audience-first mentality and begin to consider tactical execution relevance in relation to audience behavior and intent. When executed with an informed strategy, TV synchronized media is an innovative and unique opportunity to truly execute a multi-channel strategy that can help solve for key brand challenges.

Please contact your CMI/Compas lead to learn more about how a second screen strategy can help move the needle on your key brand challenge and how we can help navigate the TV synchronized media partner landscape.

Sources

2018/2019 Doublebase Kantar MARS Health Study – via TGI360, Q2 2018 Nielsen Total Audience Report, eMarketer